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Scholarly Resource Alert! A freely available resource, Italian Renaissance Learning Resources features eight units, each of which explores a different theme in Italian Renaissance art.

Time and Narrative: This unit examines the representation of narrative in fifteenth-century Italian religious paintings. It considers the impact of naturalism on the depiction of sacred themes; the role of visual imagery in religious practice; and the physical and temporal constraints that the medium of painting placed on narrative exposition. It traces several different approaches to the challenges posed by narrative, including the creation of physically composite devotional objects; the development of illusionary depth as a means of expanding the expression of time; and the simultaneous representation of multiple narrative episodes within a single, unified pictorial field—a technique known as continuous narrative.

This project is a collaboration between the National Gallery of Art and OUP’s Grove Art Online. It was made possible through the support of the Samuel H. Kress Foundation.
Image credit: Benozzo Gozzoli - The Feast of Herod and the Beheading of Saint John the Baptist, Samuel H. Kress Collection. Image courtesy of the Board of Trustees, National Gallery of Art.

oupacademic:

Scholarly Resource Alert! A freely available resource, Italian Renaissance Learning Resources features eight units, each of which explores a different theme in Italian Renaissance art.

Time and Narrative: This unit examines the representation of narrative in fifteenth-century Italian religious paintings. It considers the impact of naturalism on the depiction of sacred themes; the role of visual imagery in religious practice; and the physical and temporal constraints that the medium of painting placed on narrative exposition. It traces several different approaches to the challenges posed by narrative, including the creation of physically composite devotional objects; the development of illusionary depth as a means of expanding the expression of time; and the simultaneous representation of multiple narrative episodes within a single, unified pictorial field—a technique known as continuous narrative.

This project is a collaboration between the National Gallery of Art and OUP’s Grove Art Online. It was made possible through the support of the Samuel H. Kress Foundation.

Image credit: Benozzo Gozzoli - The Feast of Herod and the Beheading of Saint John the Baptist, Samuel H. Kress Collection. Image courtesy of the Board of Trustees, National Gallery of Art.